Tag Archives: web programming

Computer Algorithms: Stack and Queue

Introduction

Every developer knows that computer algorithms are tightly related to data structures. Indeed many of the algorithms depend on a data structures and can be very effective for some data structures and ineffective for others. A typical example of this is the heapsort algorithm, which depends on a data structure called “heap”. In this case although the stack and the queue are data structures instead of pure algorithms it’s imporant to understand their structure and the way they operate over data.

However, before we continue with the concrete realization of the stack and the queue, let’s first take a look on the definition of this term. A data structure is a logical abstraction that “models” the real world and presents (stores) our data in a specific format. The access to this data structure is often predefined thus we can access directly every item containing data. This help us to perform a different kind of tasks and operations over different kind of data structures – insert, delete, search, etc.. A typical data structures are the stack, the queue, the linked list and the tree.

All these structures help us perform specific operations effectively. For instance searching in a balanced tree is faster than searching in a linked list.

It is also very important to note that data structures can be represented in many different ways. We can model them using arrays or pointers, as shown in this post. In fact the most important thing is to represent the logical structure of the data structure you’re modeling. Thus the stack is a structure that follows the LIFO (Last In First Out) principle and it doesn’t matter how it is represented in our program (whether it will be coded with an array or with pointers). The important thing into a stack representation is to follow the LIFO principle correctly. In this case if the stack is an array only its top should be accessible and the only operation must be inserting new top of the stack.
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More on CSS Optimization

As CSS files are first downloaded to the client and then executed, the main optimization is to make those files smaller. But that doesn’t mean only minifing!

CSS

The Minification Process

While with minification you can strip all the symbols that only take space, but are useless when the browser parses the file, there are some other techniques, which in fact aren’t so simple, to speed up the loading process. By minification you get rid of the white spaces, tabs, new lines, etc., but the file may remain too large.

Useless Rules

Yes, sadly the browser doesn’t need all those white spaces, actually web developers need them. Just because this makes the file more readable, or readable at all. However most of the web applications have one large CSS file, typically named layout.css, main.css or whatever, that contains all the rules for the entire application. In many of the cases one page of a site doesn’t need all the rules for the site, so a possible solution is to remove all of the rules that aren’t used.

There are tools that may help you do the job. Such a tool, that I’m using is the Firefox add-on – Dust-Me Selectors. Of course there are a lot other tools doing the same job, so it’s up to you to pick up one.

After removing all those useless rules you’ll see that the size of the file can be something like 20% of the size of the source file. This is interesting to note, because most of the time the minification cannot give you such performance benefit. In fact this comes with some issues.

One Request or What?

This is the dilemma of the web programming, isn’t it? However thus you can split the main CSS file to few smaller files, but they are named differently so you cannot expect the browser to cache them when the user visits the site for the first time.

The case must be, of course, tested against various situations, so you can decide what suits you. However the typical scenario is to optimize only few of the pages, as they might be the most visited – as for example the homepage. If two of the pages are mainly visited, than you can make custom, small, CSS files for them with only the necessary rules, and let the other pages with the main CSS file. If you’ve a lot of returning visitors, you can be sure the custom files will be cached (if the client cache is turned on) and the second time somebody visits the “homepage” for example the page will load faster.